VPNs: Why you need them

VPNs: Why you need them

Installing powerful antivirus software and setting strong passwords are no longer considered the bare minimum in cybersecurity. With hackers, government agencies, and ISPs constantly monitoring networks and your online habits, hopping onto a Virtual Private Network (VPN) is crucial for keeping your surfing habits private.

Google releases year-long security study

Google releases year-long security study

Your passwords are the gateway to your files, money, and identity, so it’s no surprise that hackers are constantly trying to steal them. Most cybercriminals will use malware to do the trick, but they also have other means at their disposal. Google’s year-long security investigation provides the details.

Hackers KRACK WiFi security

Hackers KRACK WiFi security

For ages, most people assumed that setting a strong password on their WiFi router was enough to prevent cyberattacks, but recent events prove otherwise. Two Belgian security analysts have found a serious weakness in WiFi networks, called KRACK, that puts your wireless devices in danger.

Your passwords are not secure

Your passwords are not secure

A password policy designed for federal agencies must be secure, right? Surprisingly, that hasn’t been the case according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). On the hook for the password best practices that we still use today — the combination of letters, capitalizations, and numbers — NIST admits that the existing guidelines were misguided.

Equifax sheds light on incident response

Equifax sheds light on incident response

What would you do right now if you discover that your business’s database is hacked and a huge number of your customers’ data gets leaked? Speechless, with dismay, but you need to act, decently. In this case, it helps to have a good incident response plan in place, so your business won’t suffer the same fate as Equifax, which is an interesting story we’re about to tell.

Office 365 users face new phishing scam

Office 365 users face new phishing scam

With the popularity of Office 365, hackers are trying to find new ways to exploit its users, and they’ve come up with a new idea: a credential-harvesting campaign that uses personalized spear-phishing mails as a tool. If you’re an Office 365 user and don’t want your account compromised, read on.

Locky-type ransomware is attacking systems

Locky-type ransomware is attacking systems

A new, Locky-type ransomware is currently infecting tens of thousands of computers worldwide. It uses the same code from the 2016 version to encrypt users’ files and it looks poised to cause another massive cyber emergency. Here’s everything we know so far.

It’s time to redefine the word “hacker”

It’s time to redefine the word “hacker”

What do you call someone who hunts for security gaps in computer hardware and software? A hacker, right? What about someone who takes their findings to vendors to help them improve the quality of their products? There is more than one type of hacker, and understanding the difference is important.

Steer clear from these types of malware

Steer clear from these types of malware

Did you know that viruses, ransomware, spyware, and trojans are all categorized as types of malware? Having been around for decades, these cyber threats have grown both in number and intensity. Needless to say, it pays to know how each of them works as well as how to protect your business.

Beware: Nyetya is worse than WannaCry

Beware: Nyetya is worse than WannaCry

The cyber community hasn’t fully recovered from the WannaCry ransomware attacks, which struck businesses and organizations in May. Now, a Petya ransomware variant named Nyetya is poised to join its ranks as one of the worst cyber attacks in history.